Now Let’s Get to Work: Reflections on the Women’s March

Women's March in New York

By Mary Noland

It was women of all ages, colors, and sexual orientation.  People came from everywhere and wanted to know where you were from.

Mary_MarchOnWasnington2The signs were homemade.  They were great.  One read: “One Step Forward for One Man, a Giant Leap Back for Mankind”.

There were four generations of one family from Maine. The marchers looked out for each other even when squeezed into a tiny space near Independence Ave.  A very short, seventy year-old mother was looking for her equally short fifty year-old daughter, and we all pitched in to help them find each other.

Unfortunately, the media let Trump distract attention from the overwhelming success of the March.  The size was clear: half a million in Washington, a quarter million in NYC, and four- plus million worldwide.

All were marching peacefully, now and for the long haul, for women’s right to equal pay for equal work, reproductive freedom, LBGT rights, and respect and economic justice for all.

I marched against the Vietnam War, worked for civil rights, and most vigorously for women’s rights in the 1970’s.  Part of me couldn’t believe that some of the signs at the March on Washington – “Protect our Reproductive Rights” – reflected words we wrote on signs some 45 years ago.

But there was a much stronger part of me that knew we were marching for this generation, for the wonderful young women in our lives, for my ”strong smart respectful and kind” granddaughter, Little Rosie, and her Mom, our loving daughter in law.

And we will continue to march for as long as necessary to protect their right to live in a decent, caring world.

The media needs to stop being distracted by Donald Trump’s ridiculous tweets and cover the real people, out in the streets, peacefully marching to protect their rights and those of their children and grandchildren.

A foreign reporter, French I think, was doing so much better on the Mall.  She tried to explain to her audience the principles of freedom and equality for which all these folks were marching. She said the marchers held these principles sacred.

We did. It was a great March. Now let’s get to work.