Capturing the Spirit of Democracy

Museum of the American Revolution
Museum of the American Revolution, Philadelphia, PA (source: Wikipedia)

 The Museum of the American Revolution opened in April of this year, funded largely by private donations.  Located in Old City Philadelphia, the museum is just blocks from Independence Hall and across the street from the First Bank of the United States founded by Alexander Hamilton.

The museum documents the history of the American Revolution through numerous exhibits, short films and reenactments, including hundreds of artifacts ranging from pamphlets to clothing to ships and weapons used by both sides.

But what really sets this museum apart is that, through pictures and short videos, it also tells the stories of real people, of farmers, African and Native Americans. And in so doing, it seems to capture the “spirit” of a Revolution where ordinary people rose up to oppose the oppression of a distant monarch and claim the “right” to govern themselves.

Upon entering the museum, an exhibit recounts how George Washington deliberately chose to live in a tent, to demonstrate that he was not above his men, and that he would share the hardships of long and brutal winters that nearly destroyed his army.  At the end of a video presentation, the curtain rises and the actual tent Washington used is revealed.

Another exhibit documents the contributions of Thomas Paine, a Philadelphian who helped spark the Revolution with the pamphlet “Common Sense” and whose later rallied troops on the brink of defeat with a series of pamphlets, “The American Crisis” (see excerpt below), written in part while Paine was encamped with Washington’s army near Trenton.

At one point, there’s a video reenactment of patriots tearing down a statue of King George III in Bowling Green in Lower Manhattan.  Its serves as a timely reminder that we must oppose tyranny in all its forms, and that the symbols of tyranny matter, whether kings or Confederate generals who fought to preserve slavery.

At another point towards the end of the museum’s self-guided tour, the question is posed: “What Kind of Nation did the Revolution Create?”  The answer suggests a tension that continues to this day:

“The Revolution is not over yet … ever since the adoption of the Constitution, Americans have struggled to balance their ideals of Liberty with the practical need for governmental authority.”

Later, as you exit the exhibition halls, there is a wall covered with mirrors.  Standing before the wall, with your image reflected in the glass, a caption asks you to gaze upon “the Future of the American Revolution.”  It gets you thinking.

Today, the spirt of the American Revolution is being challenged as never before.  It can be subtle as when our elected officials manipulate the media to cast tax breaks for the rich as health care or economic reform.  Or it can be more overt, as when those same officials denigrate and arrest minorities.

But subtle or overt, such actions betray the values of our founders fought for.  The Museaum of the American Revolution reminds us we have a duty as citizens to look in that mirror, and to fight to reaffirm the principles of justice and equality for all that are the foundation of our great democracy.

THESE are the times that try men’s souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives every thing its value. Heaven knows how to put a proper price upon its goods; and it would be strange indeed if so celestial an article as FREEDOM should not be highly rated. (Thomas Pain, the American Crisis, December 23, 1776)

Now Let’s Get to Work: Reflections on the Women’s March

Women's March in New York

By Mary Noland

It was women of all ages, colors, and sexual orientation.  People came from everywhere and wanted to know where you were from.

Mary_MarchOnWasnington2The signs were homemade.  They were great.  One read: “One Step Forward for One Man, a Giant Leap Back for Mankind”.

There were four generations of one family from Maine. The marchers looked out for each other even when squeezed into a tiny space near Independence Ave.  A very short, seventy year-old mother was looking for her equally short fifty year-old daughter, and we all pitched in to help them find each other.

Unfortunately, the media let Trump distract attention from the overwhelming success of the March.  The size was clear: half a million in Washington, a quarter million in NYC, and four- plus million worldwide.

All were marching peacefully, now and for the long haul, for women’s right to equal pay for equal work, reproductive freedom, LBGT rights, and respect and economic justice for all.

I marched against the Vietnam War, worked for civil rights, and most vigorously for women’s rights in the 1970’s.  Part of me couldn’t believe that some of the signs at the March on Washington – “Protect our Reproductive Rights” – reflected words we wrote on signs some 45 years ago.

But there was a much stronger part of me that knew we were marching for this generation, for the wonderful young women in our lives, for my ”strong smart respectful and kind” granddaughter, Little Rosie, and her Mom, our loving daughter in law.

And we will continue to march for as long as necessary to protect their right to live in a decent, caring world.

The media needs to stop being distracted by Donald Trump’s ridiculous tweets and cover the real people, out in the streets, peacefully marching to protect their rights and those of their children and grandchildren.

A foreign reporter, French I think, was doing so much better on the Mall.  She tried to explain to her audience the principles of freedom and equality for which all these folks were marching. She said the marchers held these principles sacred.

We did. It was a great March. Now let’s get to work.